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20110701
20110731
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WETA 6
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WETA
Jul 13, 2011 6:00pm EDT
based in pakistan. these latest bombs have been described as relatively crude and possibly the work of local militants. whoever is behind them makes sure that india's city is still vulnerable. >> for more on today's violence, i spoke with the ambassador who formerly served as u.s. assistant secretary of state for south asian affairs. he is currently at the center for strategic and international studies. i started by asking who he thought could be behind the attacks. >> well, i know one thing, that mumbai, it is a very sad day for mumbai, the fourth attack in the last 10 years. this city has been attacked by terrorists on many occasions, and this is the latest episode. it does not appear to be the same nature of attack that occurred in november of 2008, the suicide bombers that attacked in mumbai, killing 166 people that were tied to the l.e.t., a pakistani-based militant group. this appears to be more sporadic. it does not appear to be the same kind of attack. india has seen these before by a group called north dakota and mehanna hedin. it is an indigenous group. they have done thes
WETA
Jul 25, 2011 7:00pm EDT
correspondent pamela constable, about her new book on pakistan's double game with the >> it's always sort of had this nuanced, subtle, denied unclear relationship with all these militant groups. but now it's all come back to haunt them. u.s. and the taliban. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> oil companies have changed my country. >> oil companies can make a difference. >> we have the chance to build the economy. >> create jobs, keep people healthy, and improve schools. >> ...and our communities. >> in angola chevron helps train engineers, teachers and farmers, launch child's programs. >> it's not just good business. >> i'm hopeful about my country's future. >> it's my country's future. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from vie
WETA
Jul 29, 2011 6:00pm EDT
rooms in brussels, can do about it. >> they were the worst floods in pakistan's history and a year ago today torrents of water were tearing through villages, destroying everything in their path. almost 2,000 people killed and 2 million homes destroyed. many families are still struggling with little help from the authorities. we have a report from northwest pakistan. >> the rainy season is just starting again. harmless as the water looks now, it has filled people here with dread. it is brought back the memory of images like these from last year, heaviest rains ever recorded reeked havoc across pakistan. nearly 20 million people were affected. this village was one of the first places the flood struck. people here had no warning of the disaster that was coming their way. villagers say a massive wall of water came through here from that direction and hit the village and destroyed a lot of the houses and caused a lot of deaths. in fact, a year on they still haven't found all of the bodies of those who were swept away. this woman did manage to find her two teenage daughters, but it took days
WETA
Jul 24, 2011 9:30am EDT
america. >> i was raising money when i was in my corporate role for the earthquakes in pakistan and went with other c.e.o.s to pakistan, save the children was on the ground and doing extraordinary work. in pakistan and it sort of stuck in my mind that is the kind of organization i would love to be a part of. >> when mulcahy retired from xerox after 34 years, she remembered that trip to pakistan. >> i wanted to make a change and i've always had a belief that if you are privileged to have a role like that, your post c.e.o. life should be about hopefully making a difference in a world of social responsibilities. >> she says her corporate background comes in handy in her new role. >> if you've had a long career in the corporate world, your relationships your ability to get visibility towards important topics becomes very important. there is a discipline in the corporate world about return on investment and metrics that are expected by donors these days in the non-profit world are also enhanced by some of that corporate experience. so it's not so much the corporate set of skills versus the no
WETA
Jul 2, 2011 12:00am EDT
. and there is a problem that some governments are hostage to the religious leaders. pakistan is a good example. saudi arabia. >> iran is a much more intense example because we have the religious leaders within the government to have the control but take north africa i think some of the most enlightening kind of intellectual work being done happens in morocco, tune ease -- ton ease ya, algeria and egypt, or will you find it in indonesia or malaysia or in sub sahharan africa. so there is an internal muslim problem that muslims need to address by themselves. it's not going to lp if it is tainted by some european assistce. that's the inside problem but muslims are not paying sufficient attention to that and i doelieve that american muslims can play the role of a talyst. and you know what, when i do my research in india and pakistan, i find people there telling me that you know the way forward is going to be that you people in the west, you muslims living in the west, in north america and europe, you guys might be pave approximating the way. i said really, do you really want us to show you the way, we hav
WETA
Jul 4, 2011 7:00pm EDT
is in captivity. that's happened, for instance, in pakistan with a man named umar, a columnist, who was abducted and sexually assaulted. he was sodomized in retribution for his writing. >> warner: a lot of these victims at least the women, have never told their stories before to anyoee other than friends or family. why not? >> there are a number of reasons. the biggest one i heard from international correspondents was the fear of losing assignments. i have spoken to at least two journalists that told me that they were taken off assignments specifically because they came forward to talk about their sexual assault. so it really does happen. they don't want to be appear to be weak or vulnerable. women told me repeatedly that they had worked very hard to overcome this sense that they were the weaker gender in this profession and that them didn't feel that they could reveal that they had been raped without it making them look somehow more vulnerable.รงรง there are also.... >> warner: what about the local reporters? what were usually their reason for not saying anything? >> a lot of different cultura
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6